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Please consider where you stand in view of the following long-term goals.

1. I carefully consider how, when and why to use digital technologies in language teaching, to ensure that they are used with added value.
I do not or only rarely use technology in language teaching. When I use technology, it is based on basic tools such as email or DVD videos.
I make basic use of available digital devices, e.g. digital whiteboards, projectors or multimedia content (e.g. audio, video) in a language class.
I use a variety of digital strategies and interactive tools in my teaching practice, both in-class and distance teaching corresponding to learners’ digital literacy and technical potential.
I use digital tools and digital educational content to systematically enhance language teaching and to motivate language learners, corresponding to learners’ interests, digital literacy and the CEFR-descriptors. I am able to provide attractive and entertaining language content.
I use digital tools and content to implement innovative pedagogic strategies at any level and keep up with the trends in language teaching, verify their effectiveness and revise them for further language teaching practice.

2. I monitor learners' activities and interactions in the collaborative online environments we use.
I seldom use digital technologies to communicate with my learners.
I use basic digital strategies to communicate with learners and monitor their progress, using common online collaborative environments.
I frequently use the well-known communication tools (instant messaging system, chat, message board) to monitor learners’ activity for language learning.
I regularly monitor and analyse learners' online activity (discussions, blog/diary entries, progress) in the target language, moderate online discussion forums and actively participate in social media exchanges and discussions.
I regularly intervene with motivating or corrective comments in the target language, using a variety of digital language teaching tools (podcasts, tutorials or digital manuals) or using the full potential of LMS, social media and other channels.

3. When my learners work in groups, they use digital technologies to acquire and document evidence.
In a language class I do not or seldom consider how to involve my learners in collaborative activities by means of digital tools.
I sometimes find it difficult to integrate digital technologies into group work because of various reasons (low learners’ digital literacy or language level, access to appropriate software, etc).
I encourage my language learners to use digital technologies to search for and share information, to present their results in digital formats and make use of basic e-learning platform functions.
I often set up assignments to encourage collaborative learning using the internet to find information and to present the results in different digital formats in the target language.
My learners systematically exchange evidence and jointly create knowledge in the target language in a collaborative online space using a variety of digital tools (wikis, blogs, social media, message boards, planning tools, content creation tools, etc…).

4. I use digital technologies to allow learners to plan, document and monitor their learning themselves.
I do not or seldom consider using digital technologies for self-regulated learning in my language class.
Learners do reflect on their language learning but rarely use simple digital technologies, like quizzes.
I sometimes use simple online assessment tools, for example, quizzes or questionnaires in my language teaching practice.
I regularly use a variety of digital technologies to enable learners to manage their learning process and reflect on their progress.
After critical reflection I systematically integrate appropriate digital tools to enable learners to manage and document all stages of their language learning.

Your Score:

Your Score:

Your answer: I do not or only rarely use technology in language teaching. When I use technology, it is based on basic tools such as email or DVD videos.

You should be aware that many learners use digital technologies for various purposes in everyday life.

Taking advantage of this and expanding their competences and your repertoire of digital technologies in language teaching/learning can be of great benefit to your teaching.

The advantage of doing this is that you can more actively involve learners in language classes, making classes more interesting and engaging. Furthermore, it allows you to collect data on which aspects of your teaching have been understood by learners, and which you may have to revise to improve effectiveness.

There are a number of ways for you to get started. Most of your learners will most likely have a digital device with them (e.g. their mobile phone). You can intersperse your language teaching with practical and interactive digital tasks for them to do on their phone. For example, when learning new vocabulary or idioms, learners could use an online dictionary to look up new words or other information as well as practice pronunciation.

For listening comprehension, learners could use common search engines or apps that provide lyrics to learn about singers and songs popular in the country where the target language is spoken.

Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Apps such as deepl.com for translating language.
  • Lyrics training, Spotify can be used to support listening comprehension.
Ask your learners to use their digital device for short activities using multimedia in the learning session.

Your answer: I make basic use of available digital devices, e.g. digital whiteboards, projectors or multimedia content (e.g. audio, video) in a language class.

Basic digital devices have been used in language teaching for many years. With technological progress, new designs, software and opportunities it is good practice to introduce and/ or make use of new devices.

A greater variety of digital devices will better allow learners to grasp the concepts learned and to identify concepts they have not mastered well. Furthermore, using a wider range of devices allows you to collect evidence on which aspects of your teaching are well understood by learners, and which you may have to revise again.
Most of your learners will most likely have a digital device with them (e.g., their mobile phone). You can take advantage of this by enriching your teaching with practical and interactive tasks for learners to do using this, including,, e.g. use of additional apps to support textbooks, to look up new vocabulary and idioms, to search for specific language learning information, to retrieve worksheets from a storage platform , to undertake little polls and quizzes for reception activities (e.g. listening or reading comprehension), to practice grammar, etc. A good approach to this may be to try and accompany every language lesson with at least one digital activity.
Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Simple interactive tools, such as: Kahoot or Quizzlet, Wordscramble, Wordsearch, or Minimal Pair Tree can be used for live interactive tasks like matching words with pictures, repeating correct spelling or pronunciation patterns, etc.
  • Online notice boards for sharing ideas, pictures, to-do lists, such as Padlet or Flinga.
Try to involve learners in digital activities in-class, thus amplifying your repertoire of language teaching practices. Try also to reuse and adapt interactive activities matching your learners’ digital competences.

Your answer: I use a variety of digital strategies and interactive tools in my teaching practice, both in-class and distance teaching corresponding to learners’ digital literacy and technical potential.

In your teaching practices you may use a broad repertoire of digital tools and strategies. To add to this, consider how you may make your teaching content even more attractive. You could do this by selecting entertaining language content or creating it yourself.

Different digital tools are designed to progressively build up learners' communicative competences and confidence in the target language. By using attractive content along with a range of different digital tools, you can improve learners’ motivation and their interest in the learning content will increase.
Variety is important. However, if digital tools are not used meaningfully, there is a risk that they may cause confusion. The best way to address this is to focus on the learning objectives of your teaching first, and then match all strategies, digital or not, to the learning activities and assessment approaches relevant for these objectives. The next step to this would then be to consider the following questions: Is the digital activity I am using for the four modes of communication: reception, production, interaction and mediation really appropriate? Is this activity adding value for my learners? Do the different digital activities I employ form a consistent set and meet the requirements of the new-CEFR-descriptors?.
Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Platforms for supporting collaborative written online interaction such as Linoit, Flinga, YoPad or Google Documents.
  • Tools for recording and presenting learning material such as Screencast-o-matic.
  • Tools for creating digital books such as Powtoon, Storyjumper.
Focus on enhancing language teaching methods and strategies that are specifically tailored for learners in light of CEFR-new descriptors, especially mediation and online interaction.

Your answer: I use digital tools and digital educational content to systematically enhance language teaching and to motivate language learners, corresponding to learners’ interests, digital literacy and the CEFR-descriptors. I am able to provide attractive and entertaining language content.

You are able to use digital tools and digital educational content effectively. You consider learners’ interest, their digital literacy and language level. Showing your creative potential and choosing tools which are not only valued for their language content and educational potential but also for their design, interface or graphics will allow you to improve your abilities in this area and to think a bit ‘outside the box’.

The benefit to this approach is in your learners getting more and more involved and the interpersonal interaction in the target language being considerably enhanced and gaining a new dimension.

Think of one of your favourite language topics, e.g. grammar, syntax, orthography, new vocabulary etc., and reflect upon what you find fascinating about it. Then consider how you, as a learner, would like to make first contact with this topic and engage with it, imagining that there are no institutional, curricular or spatial restrictions. Which questions would drive the language learning process?

Consider how the ‘wide-open field’ approach could be adapted so that your learners' learning can come closer to the language learning goals.

Let the learners choose the approach of how to deal with the content learned using digital tools.

Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include digital tools which allow learners to develop their own creative projects such as podcasts (Vocaroo for basic audio development and/ or Audacity for advanced audio), videocasts or stories (Pixton, Makebeliefscomix, Playposit) or animations (Powtoon).
Innovate your language teaching and learning considering the CEFR-new descriptors. Promote creative online interaction and learn to deal with potential biases of language learners towards digital technologies.

Your answer: I use digital tools and content to implement innovative pedagogic strategies at any level and keep up with the trends in language teaching, verify their effectiveness and revise them for further language teaching practice.

You can freely use digital tools and content to implement innovative pedagogic strategies at any level of language learning. However, you should continuously and critically reflect on the appropriateness of your digital language teaching strategies based on your learners’ needs.

Regular objective assessment of digital strategies can help to keep balance and not digitalise the entire learning process unnecessarily. Monitoring learners’ needs, and expectations will provide you with guidelines for further development of teaching strategies and will make your teaching process more meaningful for learners.
When facilitating communicative competences for reception, production, interaction and mediation, make sure that these are practised in a balanced way. Do not get carried away with too many or overly-complex innovative digital approaches. If, upon critical inspection, your evaluation shows that your language learners are not ready for the format you propose or cannot benefit from it, you should reconsider it. There may also be practical constraints that will stop you from doing everything you know you can do. There is no one size fits all solution. Remain flexible and creative, when designing your educational resources.
Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Digital tools which allow learners to develop their own creative projects such as podcasts (Vocaroo for basic audio development and/ or Audacity for advanced audio), videocasts or stories (Lightworks, Pixton, Flipgrid) or animations (Powtoon).
  • Digital tools such as Genially, Prezi, Emase which can be used to support the use of infographics, dossiers and video presentations.
Focus on learners' needs in light of CEFR-new descriptors.

Your answer: I seldom use digital technologies to communicate with my learners.

While it might be sometimes difficult to use digital environments to keep in touch with your learners, it can be hugely beneficial for both teachers and learners.

Group work is a highly effective way to promote language learning and if digital environments are used, it becomes much easier for you to provide the support your learners need. Online collaborative environments can help you channel both your learners' communication (e.g. on problems and questions they have) and collaboration (e.g. on projects they work on in groups) within a single space.
There are many different self-standing or integrated services addressing these two goals jointly or separately. Many of them are open-source or available for free. A useful starting point may be a chat group using a solution familiar to yourself and/ or your learners. Try out a number of solutions to see which works best for you.
Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include common and popular sites such as WhatsApp, Facebook, Zoom are good starting points as even learners with low levels of digital skills may be familiar with how to use these.
Try out an online collaborative environment with your learners.

Your answer: I use basic digital strategies to communicate with learners and monitor their progress, using common online collaborative environments.

It is good to encourage learners to interact online so that they can manage their cooperation themselves. However, your relationship with your learners, and their learning, is improved when you are present. Let learners see that you are reviewing their work, not to control them, but to help them develop their language competences in an effective and supportive way.

Finding a good balance between overseeing learners' progression by themselves, being present to support them and allowing them to work independently - by themselves or in groups - helps to promote independent learning while also ensuring that learners do not feel that they are isolated.
A useful step here is to agree with learners early in the learning process how often you will communicate with them and what digital tool(s) will be used to do so. To do so, consider how you will:
  • Act as a facilitator or coach. Analyse evidence, give individualised constructive feedback.
  • Give group assignments which will require interaction among learners.
  • Try to engage your learners in such a way that they have a chance to develop interaction strategies such as cooperating, asking for clarification and turn-taking in a foreign language.
Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Common Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) such as Moodle, Microsoft Teams, Flinga, Padlet or GoSoapBox are useful platforms to support interactions.
  • Digital platforms to better organize the work with classes are Slack or Diigo.
  • Online questionnaires such as Google Forms, SurveyMonkey can simplify the process of getting learner feedback.
Establish a greater presence. Monitoring can be a useful way to track progress and to allow opportunities to provide learners with feedback or to “check in” with them. Consider introducing regular formative activities to support this.

Your answer: I frequently use the well-known communication tools (instant messaging system, chat, message board) to monitor learners’ activity for language learning.

It is often very useful to use simple communication tools such as instant messaging systems, message boards, etc. to monitor and guide learners’ interaction. It can happen, however, that learners may not actively engage with them, which results in “empty spaces”, which do not help learners.

Involving learners in online interaction enables them to practice a variety of written language elements, e.g. acronyms, abbreviations. Additionally, it raises their awareness about the language register.

You can also use common communication tools to go beyond just “checking in” with learners and use these spaces as opportunities for more in-depth learning and engagement by setting concrete tasks and asking learners to use these spaces to share their answers and feedback.

One way of supporting this process would be to use a communication space such as a discussion board to offer learners additional support resources and direct their work, e.g. by offering additional information or links.

You can also use more advanced communication tools to hold live discussions with your learners as a way of checking in with them. This will allow the learning to move into the area of spoken and listening proficiency and will help learners to feel more connected to you and their peers (beyond, e.g. a text-based message board).

If your learners come from different cultural backgrounds this process can also be an opportunity to improve their plurilingual and pluricultural competence.

Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Social networking spaces or forums such as Facebook, Unilang, HiNative, EdModo which can be used to offer a space for learners to share feedback, resources, beyond just text-based content.
  • Tools for realtime collaboration, such as Ziteboard or Padlet, YoPad.
You should consider using more advanced online interaction tools, such as blogs, social channels, forums not only to monitor your learners' discussions, but to also offer guidance when needed, without undermining learners' ownership and engagement.

Your answer: I regularly monitor and analyse learners' online activity (discussions, blog/diary entries, progress) in the target language, moderate online discussion forums and actively participate in social media exchanges and discussions.

Monitoring and analysing learners’ online activity has become your everyday routine.

You are able to use collaborative digital environments to understand individual learners better and adapt your teaching accordingly. You can analyse their linguistic performance and react accordingly.

Your learners will feel more secure when they know their language performance is monitored and guided. They will always appreciate some guidance and feedback.

Whenever you see that your learners are at a loss, help them, for example, by offering additional resources, such as online tutorials, interactive language exercises, etc. However, you should bear cultural differences in mind when working with international groups as these might affect language understanding, production and interaction skills and strategies (for example turn-taking).

In case of cultural differences, gently explain cultural peculiarities which might affect language performance.

Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Common Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) such as Moodle, Microsoft Teams, Acadly or Coefee are useful platforms for monitoring and guidance.
  • Miro, YoPad and Speaky for collaborative language activities.
  • Online feedback spaces such as Google Forms or Padlet, Flinga, Poll everywhere for written assignments.
Provide guidance when needed and consider your learners' difficulties, interests and preferences. Broaden your repertoire of digital communication tools to address apparent learning needs.

Your answer: I regularly intervene with motivating or corrective comments in the target language, using a variety of digital language teaching tools (podcasts, tutorials or digital manuals) or using the full potential of LMS, social media and other channels.

Your range of use of digital tools is impressive. Use your experience and expertise to anticipate and prevent the potential problems in interaction in online environments.

This allows you to understand individual learners better and adapt your teaching accordingly.

When assigning a group task, it would be a good idea to set a timeline and arrange for group or individual meetings for reporting, consultation and further guidance.

However, remember to only offer guidance when really needed and do not undermine learners' ownership of and engagement in peer collaboration and in their own performance.

You can also ask your learners for self-reflection and self-assessment following different kinds of portfolio formats with can-do statements referring to CEFR-descriptors.

At higher levels of language proficiency, you can ask your learners for suggestions for technical digital solutions which they have found useful in other fields.

Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Enhanced virtual classrooms such as Second Life, Classcraft.
  • Tools for brainstorming and planning projects such as Mindmeister, Miro, Flinga.
Anticipate and pre-empt learner problems but also try to address your learners’ needs individually. Make sure to use what you know about your learners' difficulties, interests and preferences for improving the effectiveness of your language teaching, i.e. re-arrange, re-focus or re-teach course content to address apparent learning needs.

Your answer: In a language class I do not or seldom consider how to involve my learners in collaborative activities by means of digital tools.

The modern working world is essentially based on collaborative processes. Therefore, group work is an important part of education. It is particularly important in language learning because language is a key tool for building relationships.

In a group, learners must be able to communicate. In a collaborative learning process using the target language, communication should occur naturally. In this fashion, all macro functions are developed, be it reception, production, interaction and mediation, etc. Learners develop communicative competences in a natural setting –we do not have to provide “structured” lessons as communication comes naturally when learners start working together, e.g. on a group assignment.
A collaborative digital learning environment, such as a wiki or a blog, can help learners work in groups to structure their collaboration and effectively document their learning.
Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Popular communication tools such as WhatsApp, Speaky, or Facebook are often a very useful initial means of creating a working group.
  • For collaborative writing you can use Padlet or Zumpad.
Try to encourage your learners to get involved in collaborative activities on a more regular basis, ideally using digital collaborative environments. This will enhance social interaction and digital skills and positively affect learners’ communicative strategies (e.g. interaction and mediation).

Your answer: I sometimes find it difficult to integrate digital technologies into group work because of various reasons (low learners’ digital literacy or language level, access to appropriate software, etc).

You are aware of how important it is for your learners to be able to collaborate effectively. It is equally important for your learners to learn how to research and investigate a topic and to document, present and share their findings in a digital format.

The communication process itself is very important when teaching about language. All spontaneous, uncontrolled online communication (texting, instant messaging system, etc.) will give a language teacher a lot of insight into the effectiveness of the teaching and learning process. Digital technologies can substantially enhance the quality of the work produced by learners in group activities, as well as develop their interaction or mediation activities and strategies. When working in multicultural groups they will also build on their plurilingual and pluricultural competence (e.g. plurilingual comprehension when other members of the group may subconsciously use words in their mother tongue).
Virtual Learning Environments (VLE) can be very effective for these purposes. Very often the institution you work for will provide such a learning environment - so find out about its potential use and function. It can also be useful to participate in a training course to learn how to make the most of the available VLE functions.
Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Platforms for collaborative learning such as Moodle, Google Drive, Linoit.
  • For mediating language activities you can use Miro or Coggle.
Integrate internet research or multimedia production to engage learners in collaborative work.

Your answer: I encourage my language learners to use digital technologies to search for and share information, to present their results in digital formats and make use of basic e-learning platform functions.

Your learners are familiar with some online tools used for supporting collaboration. The next step for you may be to use digital strategies more systematically to enhance collaborative knowledge creation.

A collaborative digital environment can help learners to focus on in-classroom learning and to more efficiently finalise group assignments at home. Moreover, digital environments can allow you to structure group discussion and to interfere when needed.

Consider the problems and limits of how you are currently implementing teamwork-related activities. Are there problems based, for example, on differences in working patterns between members on teams; inefficient communication processes; unequal participation; lack of discipline and-or a high workload in assignments that impacts group work?

Virtual Learning Environments (VLE) can be used to document and showcase the results achieved by your learners. Very often the institution you work for will provide such a learning environment. When you meet your learners online using synchronous digital tools, the input by different team members may become transparent to you and their peers.

Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Virtual Learning Environments such as Moodle, Microsoft Teams, Acadly.
  • For synchronous online meetings, you can use VOIP tools such as Zoom, BigBlueButton, Clickmeeting or Google Meet.
  • You can use more advanced tools for collaborative projects like Story jumper, Pixton or Make Beliefs Comix, LearningApps.
  • Google Slides, Prezi, Genially and Emaze.
Try out a digital environment to help scaffold learner collaboration. You could encourage learners to combine different digital tools for collaborative knowledge creation (e.g. presentations with embedded video or audio).

Your answer: I often set up assignments to encourage collaborative learning using the internet to find information and to present the results in different digital formats in the target language.

You show a great deal of expertise in motivating your learners to collaborate in the digital environment, to gather information, discuss it and jointly transform it into knowledge.

Collaborative activities in language classes foster not only linguistic communicative language competences but also sociolinguistic (sociolinguistic appropriateness) and pragmatic (flexibility, turn taking, coherence etc…) competences.

A collaborative digital environment can help learners to focus on in-classroom learning and to more efficiently finalise group assignments at home. Moreover, digital environments can allow you to structure group discussion and to interfere when needed. By interfering when required, the input by different team members may also become transparent to you and their peers.

You can use some basic Virtual Learning Environments (VLE) to document and showcase the results achieved by your learners. Very often the institution you work for will provide such a learning environment. Consider the problems and limits of how you are currently implementing teamwork. Are there problems based, for example, on differences in working patterns between members on teams; inefficient communication processes; unequal participation; lack of discipline and-or a high workload in assignments that impacts group work? In culturally heterogeneous groups, you have to consider cultural differences and perceptions (attitude to time, punctuality, level of independence etc…).

To make your teaching more attractive, instead of assigning spoken activities you may ask your learners to create a short funny cartoon strip.

Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Platforms for collaborative learning such as Thinglink, Moodle or Microsoft Teams. Germany: vhs.cloud.
  • You can suggest some group assignments which will require more elaborate online tools like Story Jumper, Make Beliefs Comix, Powtoons to foster their creativity.
Try out a digital environment to help scaffold learner collaboration. Make sure that your collaborative digital environment is embedded into your language teaching practice on a regular basis. Assistance, feedback and guidance will foster your learners’ motivation.

Your answer: My learners systematically exchange evidence and jointly create knowledge in the target language in a collaborative online space using a variety of digital tools (wikis, blogs, social media, message boards, planning tools, content creation tools, etc…).

You know how to make the most of digital technologies for language learning. At the same time, you are mirroring collaborative knowledge creation strategies that have become an important part of life and work in the digital age. However, what is important at this stage is to remain reflective on the benefits and drawbacks of technology.

When you remember to use variety in (digital) activities and interaction modes, you are more likely to serve all learners and address their different interests.
Provide assignments in which your learner will be able to give feedback and assess their peers. Analyse your teaching performance so far, have there been any issues which served to enrich your experience? Ask your learners for feedback. Also consider whether your mode of communication (online versus face-to-face) has the right balance and whether it brings the expected results. Has the digital environment become natural for your learners or is it still something they are confused with?.
Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Completely virtual class modes, such as Second Life.
  • Collaborative platforms for knowledge sharing, such as Diigo or Slack.
  • More advanced written production tools, such as WordPress.
Try to look for innovative solutions which will maintain your learners’ motivation in collaborative work. Define your role in the teaching process. Are you a teacher who “teaches”, a mentor, a coach, an advisor, a facilitator, a soulmate, a guide, a team member or a friend?.

Your answer: I do not or seldom consider using digital technologies for self-regulated learning in my language class.

Using digital technologies for self-regulated learning can empower learners to manage their learning process.

Sharing responsibility for the learning process can save you time and make learners more aware of their learning progress.

Consider integrating an online, interactive quiz or poll in your online teaching, or as an activity at the end of each lesson or unit in a physical classroom.

Another option could be to introduce an online learning diary, e.g. in the form of a blog, where learners document and reflect on their achievements and learning needs.

Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Various online, interactive tools, the most popular being Kahoot or Quizziz.
  • Tools to practice pronunciation, such as Minimal Pair Tree, or Natural Readers.
Start with a quick poll at the end of each lesson so that you and your learners can get used to this type of competence verification.

Your answer: Learners do reflect on their language learning but rarely use simple digital technologies, like quizzes.

You have already realized that learners reflect on their language learning but the use of digital tools to support this is still rare.

Using digital tools for self-assessment can help to reduce stress, anxiety and embarrassment in the case of failure or difficulty in assessments.

Digital tools will help learners develop communicative language competences such as vocabulary range, grammatical accuracy, vocabulary control and orthographic control in a more friendly, relaxing and sometimes game-like environment. Digital solutions help involve language learners in their management of their own learning and to make their progress more transparent to them.

Try to use some digital tools to reinforce your teaching strategies. Instead of worksheets for self-assessment, you could, for example, use online quizzes. Instead of learning diaries, you could try to use learner blogs, etc.

Experiment with different solutions and options and settle on the one that is most beneficial to you and your learners. Try to incorporate it into everyday teaching practice.

At higher language proficiency levels, try to encourage your learners to use the target language versions of the software being used to practise reading instructions and prompts in the target language.

Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Quiz tools such as Kahoot, Quizziz or Google Forms.
  • Tools to practice pronunciation, such as Minimal Pair Tree or Natural Readers.
  • Tools for grammar learning, such as Verbix or Lingofox (only German).
Experiment with different digital solutions, try to use them more often and try to match them with different communicative language activities.

Your answer: I sometimes use simple online assessment tools, for example, quizzes or questionnaires in my language teaching practice.

Occasionally using common assessment tools can be a great approach for supporting self-regulated learning. If you want to develop a competence in learners that you believe cannot be assessed using a quiz, try to use a different format, such as a blog or online diary.

While preparing written assignments, learners will be more motivated to use online tools such as dictionaries, grammar checkers and fora to ensure correct word usage. Written assignments may also positively affect production strategies as planning, compensating, monitoring and repair. Apart from developing their digital competences, learners will also need to acquire skills necessary to break down complicated information, adapt language or just simplify text (mediation). In group work, others can benefit since they will be practising reception skills, including reading for information, or as a leisure activity as well as reception strategies (identifying cues and inferring).

Systematically use digital solutions to more holistically promote self-directed learning. Think about how you can creatively use the features of common digital tools to help learners plan, supervise, and self-assess learning.

Also try out digital tools that you have not used before.

Before trying out a new tool, review its appropriateness and adjust if necessary to ensure that it supports learners' self-directed language learning.

Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include collaborative and data-gathering tools such as Go Soap Box, Mind Maps, Memrise, Quizzlet, Spellcheck Plus, Google Forms.
Creatively adapt digital solutions to your needs. Try to use a variety of digital technologies or environments to collect evidence and record your learners’ progress.

Your answer: I regularly use a variety of digital technologies to enable learners to manage their learning process and reflect on their progress.

Your learners are able to use a variety of digital technologies (e.g. e-Portfolios, blogs, diaries, planning tools, etc.) to plan their learning process and collect evidence related to the CEFR descriptors.

Innovative digital solutions can help you to collect, store and assess the evidence provided by your learners and access them from anywhere. They are also really engaging, foster collaborative work and give a lot of evidence for further analysis.

The next step for you would be to check if you are using and combining digital tools for planning, reflection and self-assessment meaningfully and with added value.

Reflect on concrete problems you or your learners encounter when using digital tools when learning a foreign language and think about how to address these problems. To go a step further, investigate if it is possible to use the data that is automatically generated in a structured way, to give you and your learners a more detailed understanding of their learning pathway(s).

For learners who possess a higher level of language proficiency, organise writing competitions or online discussions. They can also work on audio-video projects combining video and audio recordings on a particular topic. A group discussion can be set if learners need to express a personal response to a creative text/video/animation to practise their mediation skills.

Prompt your learners to take on some initiative – they may create their own website (available in 2 or more languages) on any chosen topic (e.g. something related to their professional or private life)

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Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • More advanced written production tools such as ThingLink or WordPress.
  • Tools for creating digital books or animations such as Pixton, Powtoons or MySimpleshow.
Systematically use and reflect on the appropriateness of your digital strategies in fostering self-regulated language learning.

Your answer: After critical reflection I systematically integrate appropriate digital tools to enable learners to manage and document all stages of their language learning.

Continuously enhancing digital strategies for promoting self-regulated learning shows your expertise in this field.

It can be very useful to get to know and study some Learning Management Systems in depth, trying out their various functions, assessment and evidence storage functionalities on a regular basis. If you get to know these systems you can use the data that is automatically generated in a structured way, to give you and your learners a more detailed understanding of their learning pathway and learning needs.

What is important for you at this stage is to focus on the actions taken on the basis of the feedback generated. Along with encouraging learners' ownership of the learning process it is important for you to continuously re-align your teaching interventions with learners' learning needs.

To support self-regulated learning, try to find out whether the learners in your group can integrate language competences in their everyday lives (be it either private or professional). Think of some activities in which learners may combine their language competences, digital competences and their hobbies/ interests or professional lives.

They can use the target language for correspondence, reading and writing manuals/instructions, making presentations, recording videos, etc.

Make their language learning process even more motivating by involving their interests or professional needs.

Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Tools for developing podcasts such as Vocaroo (basic), Audacity or Lightworks (advanced).
  • Video production tools such as OpenShot, or Screencast-o-matic, MySimpleshow for producing and editing videos. Learners can upload their videos to Vimeo, YouTube or some social media.
Holistically integrate your digital strategies into the process of language teaching.