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Please consider where you stand in view of the following long-term goals.

1. I use digital assessment formats to track and monitor learners language learning progress.
I am uncertain about digital assessment and monitoring formats in my language teaching practice or work environment.
I make basic use of digital tools to regularly monitor learners' language learning.
I occasionally use a digital tool, e.g. an automated quiz or a file upload assignment, to monitor learners' language learning.
I use a variety of familiar digital tools for a variety of assessment strategies to monitor learners' language learning as appropriate.
I systematically select, adapt and utilise a wide variety of familiar and emerging digital tools simultaneously to frequently monitor learners' language learning across a broad range of different assessment strategies.

2. I identify and analyse all data available to me to effectively identify language learners who may need additional support.
It is not my responsibility and I have never considered gathering or analyse data on learners’ progress by means of digital technologies.
I only analyse traditional academic data, such as attendance, performance and grades in order to support learners.
I occasionally analyse basic digital data on learner activity and behaviour, in addition to traditional academic data to identify language learners who need additional support.
I regularly analyse all available data, both digital and traditional to effectively monitor learner engagement and to identify language learners who need additional support.
I frequently track all available data, both digital and traditional, which I combine and analyse in order to effectively monitor learner engagement, and to predict language learners who need additional support.

3. I use digital technologies to provide effective feedback and ensure effective planning of teaching strategies for language learning.
I am not aware of digital feedback tools appropriate for language teaching purposes.
I use basic features of common/simple digital tools to provide digital feedback to learners.
I occasionally employ and modify some digital assessment tools in providing basic feedback for language learning.
I frequently use a variety of digital approaches to provide effective feedback and to plan effective teaching for language learning, according to specific learner requirements.
I systematically adapt, adjust and utilize a very wide variety of digital approaches, according to specific learner requirements, to provide effective feedback and plan effective teaching strategies for language learning.

Your Score:

Your Score:

Your answer: I am uncertain about digital assessment and monitoring formats in my language teaching practice or work environment.

Monitoring learners' language learning is an extra step that can be difficult, but it is nearly always a highly worthwhile process and with the use of digital tools, it can be quite easily done.

Monitoring learners' language learning is particularly useful as a way of identifying learners who may be struggling and who may benefit from some form of intervention or additional support.

Moreover, monitoring can be adapted into different language teaching activities, making them more aware of their performance and fostering the learning engagement.

A good first step to progress your experience in this area is to identify what you would like to assess and monitor: do you want to evaluate for instance what they have learned in terms of grammar, vocabulary, syntax or online interaction with peers, identifying common learners‘ language challenges and/or even ask learners‘ feedback to your teaching or involve them in the selection of specific topics/definition of learning goals in a language course.
An engaging way of monitoring their learning progress is to have a little quizz or Kahoot at the end of a training session, or measure how often they log into any digital e-learning platforms being used or how often they communicate with their peers. Alternatively, if you wanted to measure learners’ satisfaction with your teaching, you could monitor their feedback via a questionnaire usinng Google Forms or poll.
Think about what part of your learners' language learning you may wish to measure. Explore digital solutions, e.g. quizzes

Your answer: I make basic use of digital tools to regularly monitor learners' language learning.

Even if you do not have much experience with using digital assessment to monitor learners’ language learning, several reasons speak in favour of this approach.

One benefit is particularly evident with respect to the time and paper you save: Because many digital assessment formats track learner data, you can immediately access all of the data relating to your learners in 1 digital space, which removes the requirement for managing, storing and working with paper-based assessment, but which also lets you access, compare and contrast all of your learners assessment scores in the 1 space. Through this, you can immediately see how well a learner is performing and where intervention or additional support may be required.

To progress your experience in this area, simply consider an existing assessment format which you are using for specific assignments and consider how to make this into a digital assessment. A good example of this may be a placement test, or a reading comprehension language activity.

Alternatively, you could ask learners to submit a paper-based assignment digitally - through a shared file space such as Dropbox or Google Drive and showcase samples of their work.

Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Survey or quiz software such as Google Forms, Educaplay or Socrative to offer learners a simple automated quiz.
  • Get corrections for written assignments using Grammarly.
Explore different formats for assessment, which may also provide you with some automatically generated data that can help you monitor learners progress. This could be via a simple quiz tool or the use of ‘track changes’ instruments in shared documents. Start small and don't worry about doing a lot of digital assessments for now.

Your answer: I occasionally use a digital tool, e.g. an automated quiz or a file upload assignment, to monitor learners' language learning.

The occasional use of a digital tool to monitor learner's language learning can be very helpful - both in terms of the data it provides, but also in having learners experience and get familiar with digital tools. Improving in this area may simply involve adding a few more types of digital assessment formats into your process.

Using a wider variety of digital assessment formats can allow you to measure a learner’s specific language learning areas and/or gather more varied data in order to best support learners and to get a better overview of their progress and where there may be need for improvement or additional support. At your level, one of the key elements to consider in using digital assessment formats more frequently is reaching a ‘balance’ in the frequency and the type of assessment format you wish to use. Occasionally using, e.g, an automated quiz or is good, but using one more frequently throughout a semester can help ensure that you regularly check in with learners.
To progress your experience in this area, consider exploring something different to the existing digital tool you are using. A useful way to approach this may be to consider which communicative language competences you look to test or assess in your learners’ teaching and identify a tool that would help meet the area(s) you are trying to assess. This can help you think about the right digital tool.
Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Using quiz software such as Schulraetsel, Educaplay, Get.plickers or Socrative for testing learners’ knowledge of grammar/ vocabulary control and offer learners a simple automated quiz.
  • Written production learners uploading their files on storage software such as Dropbox or Google Drive.
Think about how best you can reach a "balance" of frequency and the right type of tools for assessing learners' language learning. Try out to introduce some additional assessments to learners Remember that you do not need to get this right immediately, it is something that takes time to figure out.

Your answer: I use a variety of familiar digital tools for a variety of assessment strategies to monitor learners' language learning as appropriate.

Using a range of different digital tools for a variety of assessment strategies shows a great deal of expertise and experience in digital assessment. Improving in this area really just requires extending slightly what you are already doing.

This will allow you the ability to gather a wide range of different types of data to effectively monitor learners' language learning and increase variety and adequacy of feedback.
To progress your experience in this area, it may be useful to think about the data you are receiving from learners via your assessments and how useful this is (or not) for helping you to track and monitor learners' language learning progress. You may be using a variety of assessment formats very effectively for assessment purposes, but it may also be the case that not all of the information from these assessments is helping you to effectively monitor learners' language learning and/ or not helping you to give appropriate feedback or support to learners. This often does not mean changing your existing assessment formats, but rather introducing some new formative assessments and implementation scenarios in order to provide you with some additional information. It may be worth looking at times during your teaching where you could introduce assessment items to support this.
Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Survey or quiz software such as ClassMarker, Educaplay or Socrative to offer learners a simple automated quiz
  • Voip software such as BigBlueButton, Acadly can be used to offer live spaces for communication and feedback
Think about additional assessment formats and implementation scenarios to systematically monitor learners’ language learning progress. Based on this, try to think about at what point in the teaching process you could introduce this - being careful to not overburden learners with too many assessments.

Your answer: I systematically select, adapt and utilise a wide variety of familiar and emerging digital tools simultaneously to frequently monitor learners' language learning across a broad range of different assessment strategies.

Selecting, using and adapting a variety of assessment formats and strategies to frequently monitor learners' language learning is a very admirable achievement, and indicates your expertise both in digital skills, but also in your skills and knowledge around the area of assessment in general.

At your level, it may be worth considering how to better structure what learners will produce for you as part of an assessment process and how you could use what they produce to give them a more detailed understanding of their language learning pathway. Another consideration at this stage may be to consider how your assessment formats could be leveraged to help learners collaborate and support each other.
To progress your experience in this area, it may be useful to look at outputs which the learners are - or can - produce and if these can be used to effectively gauge and track learners progress. This may involve asking learners to produce video or audio files as part of an assessment (for assessing spoken pronunciation for instance), which may then be used to monitor their progress. You could also - at your level - look to engage learners with assessment activities which require them to collaborate with their fellow learners in spaces such as discussion forums. This type of peer learning can be a very beneficial way to engage learners with each other, which in turn can help clarify which learners are advanced and which may find it hard to keep up with their peers.
Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Video creating tools, such as Screencast-o-matic, Flipgrid, MySimpleShow.
  • Discussion forums such as Lingualia, Unilang, Italki offer a space for learners for peer learning and assessment, sharing of feedback, etc. .

Ensure that your assessment strategies are aligned with your teaching strategies.

Consider how you may use learners to engage in a peer or collaborative assessment space. This would basically be an assessment activity that requires learners to interact with each other as part of an assessment.

Your answer: It is not my responsibility and I have never considered gathering or analyse data on learners’ progress by means of digital technologies.

Even if you are not familiar with the process of using Digital learner data, or if it is not your responsibility, it may be useful to start using it as it can greatly help with supporting your learners

Using digital learner data can be of great help in identifying learners who may need some additional support. The benefits to digital data is that it is immediate, can be gathered with little to no effort required from you as a teacher, can automatically update and generally can help gather data and feedback which one may not have access to.
To progress your experience in this area, it may be useful to think about or learn about some of the uses of digital data and to consider what elements of your teaching they may be able to help you with. For instance, it may be useful to regularly gather feedback from learners on how well they think they are progressing in order to provide additional support if required. If you are using digital tools or resources, it may be useful to see how often learners are using or visiting these tools or resources outside of class to see how engaged they are. Thinking about what may benefit you the most is a good first step in using digital data effectively.
At this stage, it may be more beneficial to examine your teaching processes and identify basic digital softwares, such as Google Forms to record data on learner progress.
Consider and examine available data to better identify language learners who may need additional support. If you are not sure, a useful step may be to ask your learners. They may be able to describe what habits they have that indicate that they are struggling and/ or need support.

Your answer: I only analyse traditional academic data, such as attendance, performance and grades in order to support learners.

When evaluating learners’ progress using only traditional academic data, certain elements may get overseen or unnoticed.

Using digital learner data can help offer some useful insights into the engagement of learners - that is, how actively they are engaging with your teaching. This can be of great benefit in helping to identify - and even predict - learners who may need additional support. Research has indicated that one of the most important measures for learner success is engagement, which digital data can very effectively track and monitor

Start exploring what existing sources of digital data are available to you. If, for instance, your organisation provides access to a virtual learning system (VLE - also known as a Learning management system or LMS), or you use an e-learning platform, then basic data on how often learners enter the system or how long they typically spend in the system may be very useful to identify how learners are engaging online. If you are not sure about it, ask a technician or fellow teacher if this data is available.

Another idea is to use a digital attendance tool, which can track learner class attendance, or setting up a discussion forum and asking learners to contribute to that (perhaps as part of a formative assessment or practice activity), which can indicate who is actively doing so or not.

Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • A digital attendance tool such as Qwickly, or Tophat (or even an online spreadsheet) to gather data on attendance
  • Tools for online collaboration such as Padlet, GoogleDocs to gather participation data.
A simple way to gather data around learners’ needs is to use a voting system, survey or questionnaire tool and simply ask learners to fill this in at a particular stage of your teaching to indicate how they feel they are progressing and/ or if they think they need some support.

Your answer: I occasionally analyse basic digital data on learner activity and behaviour, in addition to traditional academic data to identify language learners who need additional support.

Occasionally evaluating basic digital data on learner activity and behaviour alongside traditional academic data can be an excellent support for your learners A process for improving upon this is to try and build in additional opportunities for gathering and using digital data as part of your teaching process.

By more frequently gathering and evaluating data on your learners’ activity, this will help you better identify which learners may need some form of support and structure your teaching over the course of a programme or semester in order to form key “milestones”. This can help to ensure that no learner “fall through the cracks” as you are regularly gathering relevant data to identify which learners may be disengaging or struggling and so may need some additional support.

To progress your experience in this area, it may be useful to look at your teaching schedule and to consider any additional times or points where it may be useful to gather or check learner data.

These points could be chronological e.g. monthly, bi-weekly, etc. or linked to specific teaching activities or teaching subjects, e.g. after an assessment activity, after a certain topic has been finished, etc. In addition to considering the “when”, think about the “What” and “How”.

The “What” refers to what kind of data you may wish to gather from learners. This could be their frequency of logins, access to resources, etc. or it could be feedback.

The “How” refers to how you will gather this data. This may be in your system already (e.g. frequency of logins, access to resources, etc.) or it may be via an online questionnaire which you create.

Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Survey or quiz software such as Google Forms, or Get.plickers or Socrative to offer learners a simple survey to gather feedback.
  • Voip softwares with diverse features such as Acadly, Zoom to hold an online interview or focus group to gather feedback.
Consider your current teaching schedule and think about points where it could be useful for you to have some additional data in order to be able to timely intervene. To begin, think about the type of data that may be useful for you.

Your answer: I regularly analyse all available data, both digital and traditional to effectively monitor learner engagement and to identify language learners who need additional support.

Using basic digital data alongside traditional academic data can be a great support to learners and can greatly help monitor how engaged learners are in your teaching and what they are receiving from this. What may be useful to progress in this area would be to combine the 2 data sources to effectively monitor learners and identify links between their engagement and their grades.

Linking digital data along with traditional academic data is not a particularly easy task, but it can yield great benefits for your teaching and for learners’ experience. This process can offer great insights and make the digital data hugely relevant to tangible outputs (grades). At its highest level, this process can even be predictive - it can indicate, based on the data - how a learner is likely to proceed and how well or poorly they may engage with and complete the learning.

This information can greatly help inform if an intervention is required - where you may provide additional support or communications to help them “follow the right path”.

To progress your experience in this area, start by considering what data you have available. Academic data may include a learner’s grades, their attendance, their participation in discussions, your impression of their engagement, etc. Digital data may include how often they access the system you're using, any learning analytics you have available, their responses to questionnaires or other digital tools, etc. It can be useful to ‘put this all together” to see how a learner is progressing. A good way to begin this process is simply to put all the data into a single document, such as an excel file to get a general sense of how the learner is progressing and if there are any indicators that they may need support or even engagement.

Remember that if you feel that you would like to hear directly from learners themselves to better inform your decisions around this, you can always use a digital tool to help you gather data. This could include, for instance, an online test or a VoIP tool to hold a focus group. These can be the most effective means of gathering relevant data and can often be - alongside your existing data - the final “piece of the puzzle” on whether or not learners are engaged and/ or may need some support.

Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Test, Survey or quiz software such as ClassMarker, Google Forms or Educaplay to offer learners a simple survey to gather feedback.
  • Voip software such as Zoom, Webex, Google Meet to hold an online interview or focus group to gather feedback.
Start by trying to put all the learners’ data together in one document or format. You do not need to go into very deep detail at this stage! Simply see if a learners’ digital data (participation, access, etc.) may indicate something around their grades or general engagement (i.e. lower access to the system along with lower grades). Remember that each learner is different and if a learner is engaged and learning well, you do not necessarily need to take action for them.

Your answer: I frequently track all available data, both digital and traditional, which I combine and analyse in order to effectively monitor learner engagement, and to predict language learners who need additional support.

You are clearly working at a very high level in your analysis and use of data to identify language learners who may need additional support. At your level, what may be useful would simply be to consider adding some additional data to help provide feedback and consider additional opportunities for offering feedback or support.

Tracking all available data and combining and analysing this is a very admirable achievement, and indicates your expertise both in digital skills, but also in your skills and knowledge around the area of assessment in general.

At your level, it may be worth simply considering how you can improve upon your own personal process - through tools to help you gather or analyse the data, or else to look at the feedback mechanisms you use to best support learners who need additional support.

Given that you are currently tracking all available data and combining it and analysing it to monitor learner engagement and predict support requirements, there is likely little to “add” to your current process. What may be beneficial would simply be to examine your process and consider how you can best improve upon what you are already doing and/ or leverage this data to support learners in a practical and appropriate fashion. One means of improving upon your process would be to examine if there are opportunities for additional data-gathering during the teaching process. This could include using online surveys or polling or live focus groups to gather feedback from learners to better inform the data you have available (in particular the “link” between traditional academic data and digital data). Alternatively, it may be worth examining digital tools which may help you analyse the data available to inform your contact or support with learners.

Automation tools or services could help automate communications to learners. Alternatively, different digital tools to help you communicate with learners for feedback or support - such as live VoIP tools, or communication platforms - could help you to better encourage or support learners.

Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Automatic Content creation tools such as anders pink or Plagiarism to support automatically content creation for learners.
  • Video creation tools such as Youtube, MySimpleShow or Flipgrid to record media-rich feedback for learners.
A good step as part of this process may be to simply examine how you are currently tracking and combining data and see if there are any other opportunities to gather data and/ or ways of providing feedback to learners. A potentially useful step here may be to simply ask learners if they feel there is anything “being missed” or if they feel they would like feedback on any elements which are currently not being provided.

Your answer: I am not aware of digital feedback tools appropriate for language teaching purposes.

Providing feedback can be challenging, but the benefits that it provides to learners' language learning are extremely beneficial. Feedback ensures that learners have the right guidance to adjust or further their language learning in order to best meet the learning outcomes required.

Providing feedback on learners' language learning can be easily added as part of many existing teaching processes. In particular, the provision of feedback is of huge benefit to learners in outlining what elements of their assessment or language learning was strong, what elements were weak and what they may be able to do to address the issues.

Feedback essentially provides learners with a “map” in order to get the most from their language learning. Feedback is typically associated with assessment - both summative (“high-stake”, terminal, marked assessments) and formative (“low-stake”, informal, unmarked assessments).

Providing learners with feedback on their assessments is essential to highlighting where they went wrong and how they can improve in the future. Providing learners with feedback via digital tools provides a wide range of benefits, depending on the type of feedback and the type of digital tool being used. In particular, the use of digital tools for providing feedback on learners’ language learning allows you to exactly and clearly highlight certain assessment or learning elements, allows you to provide feedback in a clear and re-usable way and can even be automated, or facilitate peer-assessment opportunities.

To progress your experience in this area, it may be useful to consider what current “opportunities” there may be to provide learners with feedback. Typically, one of the most straightforward opportunities for providing learners with feedback is through their assessment activities. Providing feedback on assessments allows you to indicate to learners where they succeeded or failed and/ or what steps in their language learning they can take to address these failures so they do not occur in the future. A good first step therefore may be to think about how you can provide feedback to learners on any existing assessments which they have to do. This feedback can be as long or as short as you feel appropriate and can be offered in a number of different formats - but a good place to start may be to think about what kind of feedback - for specific assessments - would be useful to learners’ language learning. If you are not required to give learners assessments, consider then what other opportunities may be useful to offer learners some feedback on their language learning - this could include mid-semester reviews, feedback at the end of the programme of learning, etc.
At this stage, it may be more beneficial to think about what type of feedback and when and where you would give to learners, rather than focusing on specific digital tools.

Consider just one assessment where you could begin to give feedback to learners.

Ideally this may be an assessment in the middle or at the start of the learning programme, where you can give them some feedback which they can improve upon. Think about what would help the learner’s language learning - following their completion of the assessment. This may very often link with what they did for the assessment. Alternatively, if you are not giving learners any assessments, consider introducing a mid-semester review where you can give the feedback on how they are progressing

Your answer: I use basic features of common/simple digital tools to provide digital feedback to learners.

While it can be hard to begin the process of using digital technologies to provide feedback and/ or plan teaching strategies for language learning if you are not familiar with it, or if it is not your responsibility, it may nonetheless be useful to start using it as it can greatly help with supporting learners via feedback and reducing the amount of time you need to set aside for providing feedback.

Using digital technologies can make the process of providing feedback to learners and planning teaching strategies much easier for a number of reasons. Digital technologies can be used for feedback without the learner being in the room with you and can be quickly and easily updated. They can also provide a record for both learners and you on their language learning progression. This saves you and the learner the requirement to print or retain paper-based feedback, and can allow you to quickly and clearly offer feedback either asynchronously or synchronously without needing to be in the same room as the learner.
To progress your experience in this area, it may be useful to identify a single point in your teaching where you are currently providing learners with feedback and think about how you could use a digital tool for that purpose to make the process easier and more effective for both learners and yourself. A simple process for doing this may be to consider how you currently give feedback for an assessment (verbally, on paper, etc) and to look at what digital tools may better support you in this. An example for this could, for instance, involve creating and emailing a word document with feedback track changed to a learner instead of what would typically be paper-based feedback on an assessment.
At this stage, it may be more beneficial to examine your feedback processes for language learning, rather than focusing on specific digital tools.

Don’t worry about trying to dramatically alter your existing process for giving learners feedback. Start small and simply select one simple instance where you currently provide feedback.

From this, think about a single, simple digital tool which you may use. Don’t try to do too much too fast. If you are comfortable in using a digital tool here, you can select another feedback opportunity and look at how you may utilise a digital tool for that.

Your answer: I occasionally employ and modify some digital assessment tools in providing basic feedback for language learning.

Using basic digital tools in providing feedback for language learning academic can be a great support for learners and yourself - but slightly more advanced digital tools can be a great help in improving efficiency for you and providing more detailed feedback to learners.

Basic digital tools can be very useful as a progression from traditional paper-based feedback, but an opportunity exists to use more advanced digital tools for feedback purposes. This can be of great benefit to your learners in that the feedback which they receive can be more elaborate, more effective and ultimately more useful to them. Such tools can also be of great benefit to you in that they can add efficiency to your feedback process and allow you to spend less time on organisation and storage of e.g. word or PDF documents for all of your learners.

To progress your experience in this area, it may be useful to begin by considering the tools and processes you currently use to provide learners with feedback on their language learning. A beneficial step in this may be to consider more useful alternatives to the digital tools you are currently using.

For instance, if you have access to a virtual learning system (VLE - also known as a Learning management system or LMS), providing feedback through this can save you the process of repeatedly creating word or PDF documents and emailing these to learners individually.

Alternatively, you could look at online solutions such as google drive and/ or google docs as tools similar to word or PDF, but which are automatically stored and saved online and which you can use to share and even collaborate on with learners (this would, for instance, allow you to comment on a learner document and would allow your learners to comment on your feedback comments) which can save you difficulties in storage, access and emailing such documents out to learners.

Alternatively, you could investigate the use of apps for feedback, which would allow you to completely change the manner in which you provide feedback to learners. Apps such as engrade for instance, offer you and your learners a space for providing grades and feedback in a smartphone app.

Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include
  • Storage software such as Dropbox or Google Drive for offering learners a space to upload word or PDF files.
  • VLE software such as Moodlecloud, as a space for receiving and offering feedback on assessments
A good first step in this process may be to identify an existing digital tool that you are using to provide feedback on their language learning and to consider if there is a more effective digital tool or tools available. An example provided above involves using google drive and/ or google docs instead of emailing word docs or PDFs to learners. This step can be useful as it does not require you to greatly change your existing process, but rather to simply find a more effective set of tools.

Your answer: I frequently use a variety of digital approaches to provide effective feedback and to plan effective teaching for language learning, according to specific learner requirements.

Using a variety of digital tools for providing feedback and planning effective teaching for language learning is clearly a great support to your learners and to your own practice.

What may be worth considering at your level is adapting some of the tools which you are using to ensure that you are maximizing their use. This may simply involve examining additional features which these tools provide and/ or combining certain tools to extend the feedback you are providing your learners with.

The benefit in expanding upon your existing approach in using a variety of tools - based on adapting some of the tools which you are using and/ or combining the use of some tools - is that it can allow you to tailor your provision of feedback to the specific needs of your learners and generally provide more in-depth feedback.

Using a variety of tools also means that you will be able to provide a wider range of feedback, which is useful for helping to ensure that your learners receive feedback on more of the relevant elements of their language learning and can allow you to “compliment” the existing feedback you are giving using specific digital tools.

To progress your experience in this area, it may be useful to consider the “output” of the tools which you are currently using for providing feedback to your learners and seeing how you may enhance or extend this in a way which is beneficial for your learners. For instance, if you are using communication tools such as VoIP for live online feedback, the “output” may be the audio call which you have with the learner.

The feedback a learner receives from this call could potentially be improved upon by providing additional information, such as video of the learners’ work being discussed. Whereas previously you may provide live online feedback with an audio call via Skype or zoom, using a screen-sharing feature in these tools can help you to demonstrate on-screen the learner's work and/ or examples of correct comprehension.

Alternatively, you could compliment the feedback you are providing to the learner in the video call by e.g. using screen recording software to record yourself speaking over and critiquing the learners’ work so that they can clearly see where they made mistakes and/ or how they may improve. An additional example of this process may involve the feedback which learners receive from an automated quiz. Instead of learners simply being provided with a grade and the correct or incorrect answers, it is possible with many digital quiz tools to include feedback to specific answers for quiz questions.

You could add feedback to the quiz questions and/ or include links to relevant resources to help a learner understand why their answers were incorrect. In this fashion, you are expanding on the feedback provided by maximising the features which the digital tool(s) provide.

Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Screen recording software such as Screencastomatic, Flipgrid as a means of recording audio and video for offering feedback
  • Interactive video software such as Edmodo to annotate videos to offer spaces for additional feedback
  • Survey or quiz software such as Get.Plickers, or Socrative, ClassMarker to offer learners feedback for an automated quiz or test
As outlined above, a good first step in this process may be to consider the “output” of the digital tool you are using to provide feedback to learners and to consider how this may be improved upon. There are typically features within the digital tool which can be utilised - but if there are not, consider what other digital tools you have access to and how you could combine these to provide learners with the feedback which is most useful for their language learning. Be sure to be led however by the needs of the learners and do not simply use as many digital tools as possible just for the purpose of using them.

Your answer: I systematically adapt, adjust and utilize a very wide variety of digital approaches, according to specific learner requirements, to provide effective feedback and plan effective teaching strategies for language learning.

You are clearly working at a very high level in your provision of feedback to learners and in your planning of teaching strategies with respect to the use of digital tools. At your level, what may be useful would simply be to consider adding some additional opportunities to introduce additional tools and/ or looking to more inclusive feedback methods such as peer feedback or support.

Utilizing and adapting a very wide range of digital tools and resources based on learner requirements to provide effective feedback and plan effective teaching strategies for language learning most likely means that you are maximising the tools which are available to you. This indicates your expertise both in digital skills, but also in your skills and knowledge around the area of feedback in general. At your level, rather than looking to change what you do, it may be worth considering how you can involve learners in peer feedback approaches. The benefits of this approach primarily lies in the creation of extremely engaging learning processes for both the learner being assessed and the learner providing feedback and which can also serve to help develop learning communities amongst learners, enhancing the language learning for all participants.

To progress your experience in this area, it may be useful to identify some tools which you can use to provide learners with an online space for peer feedback. Digital tools that can support this include social media or discussion forums.

For this process, it is important to ensure that learners are given a clear brief in terms of the feedback that they should give other learners. It is also important as part of this brief to let learners know how much feedback they should give to how many other learners, etc. This clarity is important so that the learner receiving the feedback is given clear, actionable and useful feedback. This is also important for the learner giving the feedback as the process of offering feedback should require the learner giving the feedback to draw upon their knowledge and expertise in order to critically assess and identify areas for improvement.

In this way, peer feedback benefits both learners (as well as yourself) and so should be supported with clear instructions. As the teacher, you should also make yourself available to answer questions and help learners with this process. It is also important to provide the learners with a clear set of guidelines about respecting each other and each other’s assessment work when providing feedback or engaging with each other. This is essential for ensuring that learners are respectful and supportive of each other within the digital space you are using. If the process of peer feedback is successful, the online space can be developed into a space for learners to form a type of learning community where they can continue to support each other by offering feedback, sharing resources, offering advice, etc.

For more private peer feedback, providing individual learners with “anonymous” versions of other learners' work could be done via a VLE or by private mail or even via a hosting service such as dropbox or google drive.

Some tools which may be useful for supporting this process include:
  • Discussion forum tools (Unilang, Second Life) can be used to offer a space for learners for peer feedback

A first step in this process may be to see what online spaces learners are familiar with and/ or are already using. Social media spaces are typically familiar to learners and openly available to them and can be useful spaces for online collaboration and peer feedback.

However learners may wish to keep their personal and learning online spaces separate. The use of social media can also create a “divide” between learners who actively use social media and those who do not. A discussion forum can be a more accessible - if more limited - space for learners to collaborate.